finally read norwegian wood

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i’ve been meaning to read this since the time someone on tumblr made a giveaway of books he needed to get rid off his shelf. norwegian wood by haruki murakami was one of the books. i got curious because i have never heard of such author before. it was the first time i encountered the book—on the giveaway along with the other books i already knew. what i did was i googled it and the author. suddenly, i found myself fascinated—i don’t know which portion of this googling i was fascinated with, but i knew it was either about the book or about the author. of course i participated on the giveaway. i followed the steps to be done to be one of the hopeful winners. unfortunately, i did not win. it’s kinda disappointing, i know. so i just looked for the book online and settled with the cheapest one (which actually still not cheap for me.)

life. love. depression. loss. — things this book is trying to picture to be viewed by the readers as a whole. i’m quite sure lots of people like this book, but i’m also quite sure this book is a “no” to some. i have seen reviews about this book, and by my calculations the number of readers who say it’s a good novel is as many as the number of the ones who say it’s bad. i’m not surprised. the story is intense, harsh, and sad. as the narrator, toru watanabe—also a character—tries to imagine back the years of his teenhood, you would observe that there’s happiness and pain, laughters and cries, and decency and sex. there is naoko he loves, but there is nothing he can do about what he feels for her because, naoko is different, as what she calls herself and the people like her, twisted. in the story, naoko is still somehow strung with her ex boyfriend who died of suicide, who also was a good friend of toru. her sister as well died of suicide. somehow, i get her. who would not be twisted after dealing with such things and always think about them for eternity? naoko is depressed and she can’t find any reason to live much longer even though toru hopes they would work things out together. harsh isn’t it? but there is midori kobayashi. the smart one (in my opinion). she’s my favorite character here. she sticks to toru watanabe being optimistic and funny. i’m sure you would understand me why i love her. it’s her nature and philosophies that i admire—that also made me admire the author as well. yes, haruki murakami is a great author! and for this, i think, he has become one of my favorites — along with john green, markus zusak, david levithan, etc.

the only thing that i do not like about this book is the character of nagasawa. somehow sexist and chauvinistic. he acknowledges women only as people he can control and use if he can’t do anything good. nevertheless, he adds up to the greatness of the book as a whole. i mean, he’s an eye openner character that readers cannot leave unnoticed. he’s fun and smart as well. it’s like he’s the male version of midori. philosophies. full of philosophies.

overall, i love the book. it has also become my favorite next to the ‘the book thief.’ lots of things were added to my knowledge about life, love, and death. somehow it made me more accustomed and aware to things that trigger a person to become someone different.

in restrospect, i too am accustomed of changing myself day-by-day based on things that i experience, may it be bad or good.

thus, we are what we experience.

2 thoughts on “finally read norwegian wood

    • hi. although there are bad feedbacks about this book, i think you would still like it.
      anyway, i haven’t read yet his other works so i am also looking forward to getting them this year and include to my TBR. can you help me which of his works are better to read first? hehe

      Like

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